Bankruptcy: Is It Right For You?

Filing personal bankruptcy is not like it used to be. It used to be reserved for low income families that just could not make payments on their lines of credit. These days, people of all income levels are filing for personal bankruptcy. Read through the advice that follows to learn if your situation requires you to take the big leap to file for bankruptcy.

A great tip for filers of personal bankruptcy is to thoroughly prepare for the initial meeting with the bankruptcy attorney. By assembling every piece of relevant financial documentation, including mortgage documents, auto finance agreements, credit card statements, tax records and bank statements, you can be certain that your bankruptcy petition and supporting documentation includes all information required for a comprehensive filing.



A huge mistake people make before filing for bankruptcy is maxing out their credit cards. This can lead to disaster when you file and the credit card companies might not discharge the debt. If you can, you need to stop using your credit cards at least six months before you file, and ideally for a year prior. Also, do your best to pay the minimum payments on these cards for at least six months before you file.

A critical tip in filing personal bankruptcy is to steer clear of making payments to creditors, in advance of filing a petition, in an attempt to satisfy individual debts in full outside of bankruptcy court. Payments to family members and creditors made within defined periods of time prior to a bankruptcy filing can be voided and can jeopardize the chances of receiving a discharge of all debts in the case.

Know your rights when it comes to filing for personal bankruptcy. The last thing you need now, is a hassle from the legal professional that you hire to represent you. A few years ago, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act was made into law, in order to protect financially strapped consumers from being ripped off. Beware and be informed!

Talk to other professionals before talking to a bankruptcy lawyer. Talk to financial advisers and credit counselors to see if bankruptcy is, in fact, your best option. A bankruptcy lawyer has a conflict of interest, so they are less likely to dissuade you from filing for bankruptcy. Finding an impartial, knowledgeable thirty party will give you the complete picture.

Before deciding to file for relevant webpage , you may want to look into other options. Remember, when you file for bankruptcy, you are greatly hurting your credit score, which in turn, can prohibit you from buying a house, car, and other big purchases. Consider safer, alternative methods first, such as consumer credit counseling.

Seek advice from a debt consultant before you file for bankruptcy. Deciding to file for bankruptcy is not something that you should do without first seeking advice from a financial expert. This is because filing for bankruptcy will seriously hinder your ability to secure credit in the coming years.

Make sure your home is safe. Filing for use this link does not always mean you will end up losing your home. You can still keep your home, it just depends on your specific situation and the value of your home. Otherwise, try looking into house exemptions that may let you remain in the home if you meet certain financial threshold requirements.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, be certain not to transfer any of your belongings or valuables to another person. This includes taking your name off of joint bank accounts or other financial assets. The court will be looking for anything of value in order to repay creditors, and you will be asked under oath whether you have left anything out. If you do not tell the truth, you may be charged with perjury and could possibly spend time in jail. Remember, honesty is the best policy.

When you are about to file for bankruptcy, be sure you have all the financial information at hand. Even things that you do not use, should be listed in a bankruptcy filing. These could include, income from even small jobs, any vehicles listed in the filer's name whether or not they use them, and any pending lawsuits.


You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from "bankrupt" to "debtor" so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

Research as much as you can about bankruptcy to increase your chances for successful filing. If you know the laws and regulations, you can avoid courts dismissing your case or attaching penalties. Use the internet and ask consultants for as much advice as possible. You can also use your local library to gain information.

Do not "�play the system' before filing bankruptcy. Do not go out and run up all of your credit cards, this does not look good to the judge working on your case, and it will not look good on your record. Once you decide to file, quit using your credit cards immediately.

Don't make the mistake of hesitating to file for bankruptcy because you think you won't be able to file again and may need to save it for a worse financial situation. The laws vary from state to state, but you may file again after a certain period, usually two to eight years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Of course, you won't want to file again, but in case of job loss or a major illness, the opportunity is there if you need it.

If you are avoiding personal bankruptcy but fear that you will lose your retirement savings, you should know that is not likely to happen. If you have an ERISA qualified retirement program (most are), then your retirement savings are safe from claims by creditors. This applies to funds in 401ks and to most IRAs. Consult your own bankruptcy attorney for specific details for your circumstances, but you should know the odds are in your favor.

There are two common types of personal bankruptcy. One in which all your assets are liquidated and the other creates a plan to pay off debts within a few years. It is recommended that you meet with an attorney to determine which type of bankruptcy is best for your particular situation.

Once you have made the decision to go ahead with the process of filing personal bankruptcy, use the tips here to help you through it. You will find it much easier to manage the process, now that you have taken the first step and looked for the help you have received here.

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